BAC calculator

A Word from Princeton UMatter about BAC Calculators

The blood alcohol concentration (BAC) calculator that you are about to use begins with a binary gender question.  Because sex hormones have an effect on BAC (see below), BAC calculators all ask this question.  We recognize that this question should be asked using inclusive language and we have contacted the organization that created this calculator to ask that the language be changed.  If you know of an online BAC calculator that is gender-inclusive, please let us know by emailing akwagner@princeton.edu.

To use this calculator in the most accurate manner, people with higher levels of testosterone in their body can use this calculator by selecting “male” and people with higher levels of estrogen in their body can use this calculator by selecting “female.”

Click here to go to the BAC Calculator

How Sex Hormones Affect BAC

People with higher levels of testosterone in their body and people with higher levels of estrogen in their body are affected differently by alcohol. When comparing two people of the same build, those with higher testosterone levels generally have more muscle mass than people with higher estrogen levels. Because muscle tissue contains more water than fat tissue, alcohol will be diluted more in individuals with higher testosterone in their body, and the same amount of alcohol will usually produce higher BACs for people with higher estrogen. For example, on average, a 150-pound person with higher estrogen levels who drinks four drinks in one hour will have a BAC level of 0.10. A 150-pound person with higher testosterone levels who consumes four drinks in one hour will have a BAC level of 0.09.

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